Have you ever felt tingling and burning sensations in your hands and fingers? People often complain of numbness and prickling when they place their hands in a certain position or after intensive physical activity. These feelings appear as a result of nerve irritation or injury.

You've probably heard about the wide net of nerves and vessels which maintain proper body function. Your brain sends signals to the rest of your body through these nerve fibers, giving you the ability to move and feel the touch of warm and cold.

If nerve impulses can't be delivered to your upper extremities in the right way you may feel weakness, numbness, burning or tingling in your hands and fingers. These annoying sensations can interfere with your activity and impair the performance of your daily tasks.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

READ MORE: 5 exercises to avoid stubborn double chin

Your doctor can examine your body and determine the main culprit of your disturbed well-being.

There is actually a wide variety of reasons which can lead to numbness and tingling in your hands. The most common of them are:

#1. Carpal tunnel syndrome – four of your fingers (excepted the little one) get sensitive innervation from the median nerve, which is situated in the carpal tunnel inside your wrist. If this passageway gets irritated or squeezed you may feel prickling, aching and numbness in the thumb and three other fingers.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

#2. Herniated disc – discomfort in your upper extremities may develop as a consequence of neck problems. The reason is that your arms and hands are innervated from the cervical part of the spinal cord. When the internal part of the discs (formations, which normally function as cushions between the vertebrae) bulge it can press on the nerve root causing numbness and pain.

#3. Diabetes – those who suffer from diabetes should thoroughly control their blood sugar levels. Frequent spikes and high levels of glucose can damage the nerves and cause peripheral neuropathy.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

#4. Raynaud's disease – it's not clear enough why the tiny vessels in your hands and feets can become constricted leading to a decreased blood supply in these body areas. It was found that cold temperatures and stress can trigger vasospasm, causing numbness and tingling in your fingers and toes.

READ MORE: Coconut oil can make you look younger

#5. Stroke – if a certain part of your brain doesn't obtain a sufficient amount of oxygen it stops delivering nerve signals and stops working correctly. As a result, you may experience abrupt weakness, loss of arm and/or leg function, numbness and speaking problems.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

#6. Multiple sclerosis – your immune cells can attack your own cells and tissues for unknown reasons. If this problem occurs in the protective layer of the nerves called myelin, communication between the brain and the other organs gets disturbed. One of the most frequent signs of multiple sclerosis includes tingling and numbness in any part of the body, tremor, lightheadedness and vision problems.

#7. Degenerative disc disease – while aging, the cushions between your vertebrae wear out gradually and become thinner. When the disks become extremely degenerated, they can’t prevent the vertebrae from rubbing. Consequently cervical nerves can be irritated, that usually results in unpleasant sensations in your arms.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

READ MORE: Baking soda can stop hair loss and rejuvenates the hair and it promotes hair growth

The BetterMe Team wants you and those close to you to live a healthy, happy life! Your health is a valuable thing; look after your body and your mind so that you can live your life to the fullest – Remember you only get one!

Please share this with your friends and family and let us know what you think in the comments below.