Your monthly bloody events are not the most pleasant thing in the world, are they? However, your periods are a really important part of your “female” functions.

In short, your ovaries release one egg per month in order to give you ability to conceive. At the same time they produce a high amount of estrogen which makes the uterine lining thick and large enough to give an embryo (fertilized egg) a chance to attach and grow.

In the middle of your menstrual cycle the egg travels from your ovary to the womb. Remember that women are more likely to conceive during the three days before ovulation or on the day of its occurrence.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

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Another important female hormone is progesterone. It helps the fetus to survive and grow in the womb.

If fertilization hasn’t happened the level of female hormones drops down gradually giving a signal to your period to begin. During your menstruation the thick uterine lining and extra blood get discarded and removed through your vagina.

The average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. Your normal menses last from two to seven days.

Your period may be different with the passing years because of certain hormonal changes.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

In your 20s your menstrual cycle finally becomes consistent. You’ve probably noticed that several years after your period begins, it can be heavy in one month and scarce in another. The duration of the cycle could also be different from month to month. In your 20s your monthly events begin to stabilize.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

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Many women go on birth control at this age as they’re too busy building their career or don’t have a steady partner. Birth control pills stop ovulation so the uterine lining doesn’t grow and doesn’t need to be shed. In your 30s you may be glad that your menses are eventually consistent and regular.

Many of us decide that it’s time to have a baby. Pregnant women don’t menstruate you know. Your periods will also be absent for six weeks after delivery if you can’t (or don’t want) to breastfeed. If you’re a breastfeeding mom, your menses won’t come back before you stop nursing. Actually, women in their 30s don’t usually suffer from immense cramps and the other evil symptoms of PMS.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

Having heavy menstrual bleeding or unusual intensive pain may be a sign of uterine fibroids or endometriosis. In your 40s your body begins to prepare itself for menopause by decreasing the production of estrogen and progesterone bit by bit.

Estrogen is responsible not only for your fertility but also for your bone health, mental function and skin youth. As its levels drop you may experience hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and other menopausal predictors.

In the majority of cases women notice these symptoms several years before menopause eventually occurs. Your menstrual cycle can get irregular and unstable in the perimenopausal period. It’s worth consulting with your doctor as menstruation problems may be associated with myoma, polycystic ovary syndrome, thyroid dysfunction and many other health issues.

Credit: Pixabay

Credit: Pixabay

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